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Now browsing: Hometown News > Business Columns > Earl Stewart

Earl Stewart
This Week | Archive


Should you buy your car at the end of the lease?
Rating: 1.08 / 5 (13 votes)  
Posted: 2013 Apr 19 - 08:53

The best thing about making this decision is that you are holding the best hand in the card game between you, the leasing company and the dealer.

That is because you know your car better then they do. You probably have been driving it for close to three years, you know how well you have maintained it, how worn the tires are, whether or not it's been wrecked and repaired, and how many dings, dents or upholstery blemishes there are. You know if it was garaged and how you carefully you drove it. You also know, better than anybody, how well it runs. All of these things determine the value of your car.

Unless you buy a new car, you cannot have as much confidence in any other used car that you may buy than your own used lease car. The only assurance that you have when you buy somebody else's used car is their word or the dealer's word about how it was driven and maintained. That means that if you did take very good care of your lease car, drove it carefully, kept it in a garage, waxed and washed faithfully and maintained it carefully, it is worth more to you than anybody else because you are the only one who knows that. And you can never be sure about that for any other used car you might buy.

Given that you like your lease car and want to keep it, the next step is determine its wholesale market value. The leasing company usually is not in the business of selling cars, just leasing them.

Getting rid of off-lease cars is expensive and time consuming for them. You have an advantage here too, and you should be able to negotiate a good price. Remember, you know your car much better than they do. They will usually give you a price you can buy the car for without even looking at it.

Oftentimes they will call you first about buying your lease car before the lease is up. Be careful when this happens, because this can mean that they are facing a loss if they have to wholesale your car at the auction. They are calling you to sell you your car for more money than they can get for it at the auction.

That is why you need to establish the current wholesale market value for your car. Car dealers call this ACV, for actual cash value. Check the Internet for information on the value of your car. The website for Kelly Blue Book (www.kbb.com), is one of the best sources. Consumer Reports can also give you this information.

The best check on the wholesale value is to actually drive your car to three or four car dealerships that are franchised for your make. If you drive a Ford, visit as many Ford dealerships as you can and tell them you want to sell your car. You aren't misleading them because it's a lease car. You could exercise your option to buy it from the leasing company and then resell it to the dealer, if the dealer's offer was higher.

If you live near a CarMax store, the largest retailer of used cars anywhere, they buy a lot of used cars over the curb and their prices are usually very competitive.

Now that you are armed with the true market value for your car, you can negotiate the best price with the leasing company. Even if they won't sell you the car for the ACV, wholesale value, paying as much as $2,000 over wholesale for a car you have absolute confidence in is a good deal. If you can buy it for wholesale or below, you should celebrate!

Another thing to be on the lookout for with the leasing company is when they offer to extend your lease for the same monthly payment you are currently making. That is not a good deal. They are doing this because they will lose money if they sell this car at the auction at the present time. They want you to keep making payments on the car so that their depreciation rate catches up with the residual value.

The residual value is the price they guessed your car would be worth in three years. If you had leased the car for longer at the onset of your lease, the payments would be lower than they are now. Why should you pay the leasing company the same as they charged you for a shorter lease?

Earl Stewart is the owner and general manager of Earl Stewart Toyota in North Palm Beach. The dealership is located at 1215 N. Federal Highway in Lake Park. Contact him at www.earlstewarttoyota.com, call (561) 358-1474, fax (561) 658-0746 or email earl@estoyota.com. Listen to him on Seaview AM 960, FM 95.9 and FM 106.9, which can be streamed at www.SeaviewRadio.com every Saturday morning between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m.




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